Mandolin Orange

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 Tides Of A Teardrop - 2019

Tides Of A Teardrop - 2019

 Spotify Singles - 2018

Spotify Singles - 2018

 Blindfaller - 2016

Blindfaller - 2016

 Such Jubilee - 2015

Such Jubilee - 2015

 Haste Make / Hard Hearted Stranger - 2011

Haste Make / Hard Hearted Stranger - 2011

 This Side of Jordan - 2013

This Side of Jordan - 2013

 Quiet Little Room - 2010

Quiet Little Room - 2010

“Mandolin Orange is a slow-burning, steadily rising folk duo from North Carolina. Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz sing warm, wise songs about getting by in the world — and, over the course of five albums, they've mastered a largely acoustic sound that exudes gentle elegance.”

- NPR

“‘It’s time we made time just for talking, it’s time we made time to heal,’ Andrew Marlin sings in this lushly-decorated folk ballad, backed by Emily Frantz’s harmonies and the gentle atmospherics of the pair’s backing band. Inspired by the death of Marlin’s mother, ‘Time We Made Time’ makes a lovely case for confronting one’s emotional baggage head-on."

- Rolling Stone, “10 Best Country and Americana Songs of the Week”

Blindfaller just further establishes…Mandolin Orange as one of the most talented acts making music today. Unrestrained and boundless brilliance. Blindfaller [is] a gold mine of lyrical honesty and musical simplicity."

- No Depression

"The musical tapestry of Blindfaller is delicately woven with lush threads of acoustic guitar, banjo, mandolin, violin and pedal steel, all ever-present without ever overplaying. However, it's the vocal interplay of Frantz and Marlin that is the band's most distinctive calling card. Opening track 'Hey Stranger' crystallizes all of Mandolin Orange's unique qualities into one three-and-a-half minute heart punch that both soothes and aches."

- Rolling Stone, "40 Best Country Albums of 2016"

“Together, Marlin and Frantz manage an effortlessly unaffected vocal merging that lies rooted in their bluegrass roots, yet carries traces of both country and contemporary folk...there’s an earnestness to the duo’s delivery and approach that imbues the music with a rustic honesty and simplicity that belies the complexity of the harmonies and instrumentation.”

- John Paul, Pop Matters

"Mandolin Orange has been quietly gathering local and faraway fans since its debut album was released back in 2010. The North Carolina duo's music -- laced with bluegrass, country and folk -- is often wistful and contemplative without being somber, and always firmly grounded in the South."

- WNYC Soundcheck


RECENT NEWS AND HIGHLIGHTS


ABOUT MANDOLIN ORANGE

Mandolin Orange’s music radiates a mysterious warmth —their songs feel like whispered secrets, one hand cupped to your ear. The North Carolina duo have built a steady and growing fanbase with this kind of intimacy, and on Tides of A Teardrop, due out February 1, it is more potent than ever. By all accounts, it is the duo’s fullest, richest, and most personal effort. You can hear the air between them—the taut space of shared understanding, as palpable as a magnetic field, that makes their music sound like two halves of an endlessly completing thought. Singer-songwriter Andrew Marlin and multi-instrumentalist Emily Frantz have honed this lamp glow intimacy for years.

On Tides of A Teardrop, Marlin wrote the songs, as he usually does, in a sort of stream of consciousness, allowing words and phrases to pour out of him as he hunted for the chords and melodies. Then, as he went back to sharpen what he found, he found something troubling and profound. Intimations of loss have always haunted the edges of their music, their lyrics hinting at impermanence and passing of time. But Tides of A Teardrop confronts a defining loss head-on: Marlin's mother, who died of complications from surgery when he was 18.

These songs, as well as their sentiments, remain simple and quiet, like all of their music. But beneath the hushed surface, they are staggeringly straightforward. “I’ve been holding on to the grief for a long time. In some ways I associated the grief and the loss with remembering my mom. I feel like I’ve mourned long enough. I’m ready to bring forth some happier memories now, to just remember her as a living being."

For this album, Marlin and Frantz enlisted their touring band, who they also worked with on their last album Blindfaller. Having recorded all previous albums live in the studio, they approached the recording process in a different way this time. “We went and did what most people do, which we’ve never done before—we just holed up somewhere and worked the tunes out together,” Frantz says. There is a telepathy and warmth in the interplay on Tides of A Teardrop that brings a new dynamic to the foreground—that holy silence between notes, the air that charges the album with such profound intimacy. “This record is a little more cosmic, almost in a spiritual way—the space between the notes was there to suggest all those empty spaces the record touches on,” acknowledges Marlin. There are many powerful ways of acknowledging loss; sometimes the most powerful one is saying nothing at all.